Guiding Good Choices


Guiding Good Choices program, a science-based, proven-effective ATOD-prevention program that gives parents the skills they need to ensure the future well-being of their children. Parents attend the five workshops to learn strategies to improve communication and prevention of teen and early teen behavioral issues. The class is designed as a drug prevention class, but it can be useful for every family to build stronger bonds. 


This program consists of 5 2-hr workshops each week at $180 per family and includes workbook materials.


Let us know if you are interested in this class, we are looking at putting dates together for another class soon.


Location: Flyin' Changes Ranch

               11904 NE 314th ST Battle Ground, WA 98604



Contact Chrisy Parrish for more information or to register:

flyinchangesranch@gmail.com or (360) 921-2341




Guiding Good Choices® Program Goal

The goal of the Guiding Good Choices program is to prevent substance abuse among teens by teaching parents of preteens and younger adolescents the skills they need to improve family communication and family bonding. The program draws on extensive research that demonstrates the critical importance of bonding in reducing or inhibiting adolescent participation in antisocial behaviors. 

During the course of the Guiding Good Choicesprogram, parents will learn specific strategies to help their children avoid drug use and other adolescent problem behaviors, and develop into healthy adults. Parents will learn to set clear family guidelines on drugs, as well as learn and practice skills to strengthen family bonds, help their children develop healthy behaviors, and increase children's involvement in the family. 

Since there is clear evidence that the child-rearing practices, attitudes, values, and behaviors of parents influence whether their children will use drugs, the Guiding Good Choices program is designed for parents. Education that begins during the preteen years and early adolescence is key for helping parents reduce their child's risk for drug use as a teen.